Wave goodbye to the “unconscious mind”!

I came across a nice little presentation on certain problematic ways of thinking:

Let’s Wave Goodbye to the Unconscious Mind

Here’s are two excerpts:

(Lecturer stops waving hand) It’s gone, thank goodness. Now let’s get on with the talk.

This presentation concerns the problems of using nouns rather than verbs when referring to certain activities.

When we do so, we are sometimes inclined to ask the wrong questions.

Incidentally, I wonder where that wave went.

Where is it now?

Is it in my arm?

Is it stored somewhere?

This presentation concerns the problems and misunderstandings that arise when we nominalise and reify activities. We thereby create entities…..

[…]

But you might suppose that later today you may start to think about some of the ideas that I have been discussing. Surely you can only do this if there is some thing, some representation of this material – a memory – that exists in your mind and which you retrieve, when you decide to, as you would draw a file from a filing cabinet?

We can say that this is so ‘only in a manner of speaking’, but a more accurate and less misleading description, is to say that, as you are listening to me now biochemical changes are occurring in your brain that enable you, in the future, to engage in the activity of recalling this material.

But do not these observable neuronal properties constitute your memory of this information? Recall again the example of waving. An anatomist may perform a careful examination of a person’s arm and hand. From its macro-and micro-anatomical properties he will conclude that indeed the arm is designed to wave. Put energy into it and it cannot fail to wave. But nowhere in the arm will the anatomist locate a wave.

Likewise, perhaps it will eventually be possible for neuroanatomists to examine a neuronal network and conclude from its structure, properties and location that, put energy into it and it cannot help but engage in recalling recent activities. But what the neuroanatomists will not find is a thought, a memory or an image.

Read the whole thing here:

Let’s Wave Goodbye to the Unconscious Mind

 

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Synesthesia — secret passageways in the mansion of memory?

This post is a slightly modified version of my answer to a Quora question:

Is there a link between synesthetia and involuntary memory?

This is a very interesting question. I can add some neuroscientific flesh to the skeleton you have already laid out.

Involuntary memory seems to involve the ability for memories to be accessed via sensory “triggers”. This may occur via a proposed neural mechanism called Hebbian learning. Through this mechanism, “cells that fire together wire together.” In other words, if two neurons are connected together, then if they both happen to to fire at the same time, their synaptic connections are strengthened.

So to use Proust’s famous example from In Search of Lost Time, let’s say you are eating a piece of cake at teatime in your aunt’s house. A neuron — or group of neurons — linked to the taste of the cake will presumably fire. Let’s call it neuron A. Similarly a neuron that is linked to the sight of your aunt will also fire at the same time — let this be neuron B. Let’s assume that neuron A projects to neuron B. Then according to Hebb’s rule, the strength of the connection between A and B increases. This in turn improves the ability of A to cause B to fire.

The more connections there are, the more opportunities for Hebbian learning. So while you are listening to a lecture or reading a book, connections with other experiences and memories are being made, rendering the information easier to access. Synesthesia may give you more “storage space”, and as a bonus, it may give you more ways of accessing that storage space.

The memory system may be like a labyrinthine mansion. Your memories are locked away in the rooms of this vast maze of a building, and to remember something is to find a way to get to the the room where it is stored. The memory mansion of someone without synesthesia may be full of rooms that each have only a single entrance. Without knowing the way to the right entrance — the right recollection strategy — the memory may be present but inaccessible. The memory system of a synesthete, by contrast, may be like a mansion whose rooms have several entrances, as well as secret passageways linking wings of the building that are usually far apart. So a synesthete may have more ways to navigate the maze of his or her own memory!

This is of course speculation, and careful experimentation and theory will be needed to come up with a more solid explanation!

There are documented cases of synesthesia co-occurring with exceptional memory:

Savant Memory in a Man with Colour Form-Number Synaesthesia and Asperger

Synesthetic Color Experiences Influence Memory

Some more relevant citations:

Savant Memory for Digits in a Case of Synaesthesia and Asperger Syndrome is Related to Hyperactivity in the Lateral Prefrontal Cortex

Do Synesthetes Have a General Advantage in Visual Search and Episodic Memory? A Case for Group Studies

This paper suggests synesthesia may not always confer an advantage. The authors say “The results indicate that synesthesia per se does not seem to lead to a  strong performance advantage. Rather, the superior performance of  synesthetes observed in some case-report studies may be due to  individual differences, to a selection bias or to a strategic use of  synesthesia as a mnemonic.”

So synesthesia may not itself be a memory-enhancing condition, but a basis from which to discover or create improved memory-recovery strategies — a way to build new doors and secret passageways in your memory mansion! 🙂

View Answer on Quora